, , , , , ,

Why You’re Rubbish At Sales

I hate to be the bearer of bad news but it’s true.

Most people are rubbish at sales.

Why?

The simple answer is because they’re selling.

I define buying and selling differently to most people. To me buying is a considered and pleasurable process where you happily exchange money for something you want.

Selling on the other hand is hard work.

You try to convince people that they need whatever it is you’re selling. It’s all about overcoming objections,  pushing people into corners and then closing the deal.  Put like that it sounds more like institutionalised bullying.

Selling is a tough job which is why most people are rubbish at it.

People have developed in built resistance to sales techniques.

If you’re like me as soon as you recognise a salesman going through his  patter, the barriers go up and the chance of me buying go down.

Now you may very well have excellent products which will do a great job for me at an excellent price but because I feel I’m being manipulated, that the salesman isn’t thinking about me and my needs, but thinking about his month end figures and commission, I react negatively and escaping becomes my primary objective.

We reject sales people because they’re selling.

The top sales people don’t sell – they create the environment in which customers want to buy.

How To Become Great At Selling

As I’ve just said, to be great at selling, you have to stop selling and allow customers to take the decision to buy.

Now if you’re going to buy something, you are going to want to know all the details about the product:

  • What does it do – not just from the manufacturer’s point of view but from more importantly what does it do from your point of view.
  • What benefits does it deliver to you?
  • What guarantees does it come with?
  • Can you trial it in advance?
  • How can I get hold of it?
  • Do other users recommend it – what social proof is there?

What I’m saying is that you need to market your products to your prospective buyers in order to create the environment for them to buy.

So tell me: Are you doing this?

Are you starting with the three Ms of marketing:

MARKET————–MESSAGE—————MEDIUM

  • Have you identified in granular detail exactly who your niche audiences are?
  • Have you crafted  the right messages for each of your target groups so that your marketing messages are totally relevant to each group?
  • Have you identified where these groups of customers hang out? Only when you know where these people spend their time can you decide which media and which methods of communication will be right to communicate with them.

It’s time for you to stop hard selling your prospects and to start creating the environment  in which they  will want to buy.

 

, , , , , , , , , , ,

When Are Your Prospects Ready To Buy?

Sales people are very fond of the line “A no doesn’t necessarily mean no – it  may mean not now”.

This is very true.

Be there when your customers are ready to buy

As a marketer you don’t know what stage in the buying process your prospect is at. If they don’t respond to your approach, it may mean they won’t be interested ever or it may mean that they’re not interested right now.

The point is everyone is at different places in the buying cycle.

Understanding that buyers are continually at different stages reinforces the need you have to build relationships with your list of prospects because the better the relationship you have with your database the more likely they are to do business with you when they are ready to buy.

Here are five things you can do to continually introduce people to your business, establish a relationship with them and be ready when they are ready to buy.

Always have something to invite people to

This can be a webinar, a tele-seminar, a live event etc. Pick a topic or idea that relates to your product or service and get started. This helps you connect with many potential clients all at one time.

Build a community

Communities are powerful because they give people a sense of belonging to something. From a business standpoint, communities build credibility by establishing that other people like you and trust you.  Holding an event , creating a forum or getting them to “like” your Facebook page allows people to connect and engage with you.

Keep your name in front of your prospects by providing valuable content.

Once a lead is in your system, your objective is to create content that will keep your products, services and brand in front of them.  The key here is to give away something that your prospects perceive as having value–something that will benefit them or solve their problems.

Have multiple points of entry

Create multiple ways to introduce people to your products and services. One point of entry might be through your website.  You can also use free reports, books, events, referral strategies, speaking engagements, articles written for publications in your niche or industry as points of entry.

Use a variety of media channels

Once you have figured out different points of entry, send content in a variety of formats so that you are sure to hit your customers’ communication preference.

Different people like to be communicated with in different ways. Make sure you communicate in ways that will appeal to as many people as possible.

Remember to get more clients and make more sales, you need to have a lead generation system in place that will continually supply you with potential buyers in different stages of the buying process. Create a system that starts the conversation and makes a connection, and when it’s time for them to buy, you will be the only logical choice.

, , ,

Small Business Marketing – It’s All About Personal Contact

We all know the old adages about people doing business with people and business being all about relationships.

Well both are true and even more so for small businesses.

But the fact is that modern technology is almost daily providing us with more tools which encourage us to communicate electronically through a screen.

First it was email. While email is undoubtedly a fantastic and indispensable tool I clearly remember when I worked in the corporate sector how people would email a colleague sitting just a few feet away. While email allows you time to express your thoughts in a clear and considered manner, it also allows you to hide away from personal contact.

Then came texting. Of course while it’s not used that widely in business it is very useful to find out what time you’ve got to pick up your kids from the station. Again it’s a great tool even if it is responsible for the desecration of the English language.

And more recently there has been the explosion of social media. Some people believe that the impact of the social media revolution will be even greater than the impact of the internet revolution of the last fifteen years. Whatever your personal feelings towards social media no one can afford to ignore it. It is here to stay and its impact and pervasiveness is only going to increase. But again it is contact through a screen.

The result of all this is that people are having fewer and fewer personal conversations and interactions. When you look back at the first sentence of this blog and remember that business is all about relationships  you should conclude that all us small business owners should get out from behind our screens and concentrate on getting face to face with our customers and prospects as much as we can.

While I often describe social networking as networking without having to get up early, I don’t believe it will ever be as effective as shaking hands with someone, looking them in the eye and developing a genuine human connection.

The point of this post is to reminder you that while modern digital communications have made our lives immeasurably easier, we shouldn’t hide behind our screens and that even more than ever we  need to get out there and develop real human relationships.

Business Development Advisors can help you grow  your business and take it on to the next level. If you’d like to find out more simply contact us through the contact page  www.bda.me.uk/contact